Friday, May 18, 2012

Hallway in Peachy Dream and Grey


(c) 2012 Naomi Nicholls, Hallway in Peachy Dream and Grey
Acrylic paint, vinyl

(c) 2012 Naomi Nicholls, Hallway in Peachy Dream and Grey
Acrylic paint, vinyl

(c) 2012 Naomi Nicholls, Hallway in Peachy Dream and Grey
Acrylic paint, vinyl

(c) 2012 Naomi Nicholls, Hallway in Peachy Dream and Grey
Acrylic paint, vinyl
 
 (c) 2012 Naomi Nicholls, Hallway in Peachy Dream and Grey
Acrylic paint, vinyl

(c) 2012 Naomi Nicholls, Hallway in Peachy Dream and Grey
Acrylic paint, vinyl
 
(c) 2012 Naomi Nicholls, Hallway in Peachy Dream and Grey
Acrylic paint, vinyl
Hallway in Peachy Dream and Grey is a painting in a hallway one both walls.  Shades of peach and grey are rolled onto the wall and down onto the floor.  Lines have been stencilled - rectangular structures that appear to be behind the surface of the wall/floor.  This is stencilled through different layers of colour, and some lengths of the line are not stencilled, but are completed with green vinyl.  Two large odd-rectangles of navy blue and royal blur float amongst the atmospheric peach and grey.  Three lines of royal blue vinyl extend from one of the shapes diagonally across the floor and run up the opposing wall to a height of approx. 5m.  
This work took a few days of work, and a few days of looking.  The hallway has a very high ceiling, yet the wall on one side is only about 2m high.  So there was a lot of negative space to consider.  I like to leave a lot of negative space in my work.  I feel it's as important as the painting and vinyl.

Due to the regulations of the building, I wasn't allowed to paint onto the surface of the floor, but I wanted to get off the wall and out into the space of the room if I could.  I had a brainwave to use clear contact on the floor, as I had earlier worked out that the paint does, in fact, stick to it well enough.  So down onto the floor I went.  Such a great thing to be able to continue rolling from the wall and down onto the floor.  More of that to come, no doubt.  

The contact actually has a lot of possibilities.  I could potentially paint in places I wouldn't normally be allowed to, and then just remove the contact, leaving behind no residue. 

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