Friday, May 18, 2012

Hallway in Peachy Dream and Grey


(c) 2012 Naomi Nicholls, Hallway in Peachy Dream and Grey
Acrylic paint, vinyl

(c) 2012 Naomi Nicholls, Hallway in Peachy Dream and Grey
Acrylic paint, vinyl

(c) 2012 Naomi Nicholls, Hallway in Peachy Dream and Grey
Acrylic paint, vinyl

(c) 2012 Naomi Nicholls, Hallway in Peachy Dream and Grey
Acrylic paint, vinyl
 
 (c) 2012 Naomi Nicholls, Hallway in Peachy Dream and Grey
Acrylic paint, vinyl

(c) 2012 Naomi Nicholls, Hallway in Peachy Dream and Grey
Acrylic paint, vinyl
 
(c) 2012 Naomi Nicholls, Hallway in Peachy Dream and Grey
Acrylic paint, vinyl
Hallway in Peachy Dream and Grey is a painting in a hallway one both walls.  Shades of peach and grey are rolled onto the wall and down onto the floor.  Lines have been stencilled - rectangular structures that appear to be behind the surface of the wall/floor.  This is stencilled through different layers of colour, and some lengths of the line are not stencilled, but are completed with green vinyl.  Two large odd-rectangles of navy blue and royal blur float amongst the atmospheric peach and grey.  Three lines of royal blue vinyl extend from one of the shapes diagonally across the floor and run up the opposing wall to a height of approx. 5m.  
This work took a few days of work, and a few days of looking.  The hallway has a very high ceiling, yet the wall on one side is only about 2m high.  So there was a lot of negative space to consider.  I like to leave a lot of negative space in my work.  I feel it's as important as the painting and vinyl.

Due to the regulations of the building, I wasn't allowed to paint onto the surface of the floor, but I wanted to get off the wall and out into the space of the room if I could.  I had a brainwave to use clear contact on the floor, as I had earlier worked out that the paint does, in fact, stick to it well enough.  So down onto the floor I went.  Such a great thing to be able to continue rolling from the wall and down onto the floor.  More of that to come, no doubt.  

The contact actually has a lot of possibilities.  I could potentially paint in places I wouldn't normally be allowed to, and then just remove the contact, leaving behind no residue. 

Wednesday, May 9, 2012

Circulation: Trades Hall Loading Dock

(c)2012 Naomi Nicholls, Circulation, Installation view
White vinyl

 (c)2012 Naomi Nicholls, Circulation, Installation view
White vinyl

(c)2012 Naomi Nicholls, Circulation, Installation view
White vinyl


(c)2012 Naomi Nicholls, Circulation, Installation view
White vinyl

(c)2012 Naomi Nicholls, Circulation, Installation view
White vinyl

(c)2012 Naomi Nicholls, Circulation, Installation view
White vinyl

(c)2012 Naomi Nicholls, Circulation, Installation view
White vinyl

Have you ever been to Trades Hall in Melbourne?  Quite an amazing building with an fascinating history.  Have you even been to the loading dock at Trades Hall?  I have.  Today actually. 

There are a lot of beautiful rooms throughout the building, but the one that jumped at me was the most drab - the loading dock.  So this is where I started planning this project a few weeks ago; with a site assessment, preliminary sketches and by sourcing materials.  The most exciting of these was getting my hands on some vinyl.  I took myself off the the sign writing supplier.  Bless their hearts - they helped me out.  I was able to get everything I needed cheaply and they cut the rolls to size too!  That made installation a delight.


Installation took about three hours straight, rolling around on an office chair leaning right over to the ground in front of me.  After a light sweep and a bit of measuring, I could lay the vinyl.  It has adhered beautifully to the concrete, as the concrete is quite smooth.  However, some parts were rough and dirty, so that may not last too long there.  I had my trusty vinyl applicator, which helps apply even pressure and avoid bubbles.  The classed as 'three year' vinyl, so I think it will hold it's spot for the three weeks it needs to stay in place.

I love the way the glossy vinyl seems to sit above the matte surface of the concrete.  The gloss also picks up some great reflections of light, which play spatially.  Love that.  The work refers to the loading dock’s space of transit and storage, with each white line acting as a kind of trail in and out of the space and references the circulatory system of the building.  It also references circuit boards, mapping and crowd directional lines.

My love of sign writing vinyl continues...

Monday, May 7, 2012

Work in Progress and New Materials


Aqua has been appearing in my work a lot recently.  Time to put the aqua away.  I like variety - except of course when I don't like variety?  And I put lots of aqua in my work?  Yeah, not then.  Anyhoo, I'm 80% finished an installation in a hallway and remarkably, there is no aqua to be seen.


Painting on the floor.  I'm living dangerously. 

This hallway has a gap between the floor and the wall (the skirting board sits behind the plasterboard).  I thought it might interrupt the work too much, so I thought about how I could cover it.  Clear contact.  Yes.  Which opened up the next possibility, painting from the wall and down onto the floor, thanks to clear contact.  An exciting prospect, to be sure.  As soon as I have some parameters for myself, I like to see how far I can bend them.  Off the wall and onto the floor we go.



I had a recent fortuitous trip to a sign writing supplier to buy some vinyl, and was able to get a proper vinyl applicator.  What a gem of a thing those things are!  Excellent for applying vinyl without bubbles.  I am still mastering the art, but I'm improving.

At first, I applied the clear contact all the way along one of the walls, but I've now cut that back, since I decided not to make the painting 'droop' down onto the floor all the way along.

Here are a few shots of the work in progress.  More photos to come when she's finished.






I love finding new materials to work with.  And I feel like I am finding just what I need recently. 


I visited an automotive paint supplier and have gotten a hold of some of their fine line tape.  Great stuff.  I can now mask off lovely narrow lines.  Plus, it's a super colour just by itself!  The only drawback is that it's not great on a painted all surface.  The paint does bleed a little bit.  It does beautifully crisp lines on very smooth surfaces, like the vinyl/contact - as you might expect, since it's made for car panels.  But it still suits my purposes.

More to come on this installation.  Stay tuned.

Saturday, May 5, 2012

Other Points of View

 (c) 2012 Naomi Nicholls, Other Points of View (Installation view)
Wool, nails, acrylic paint, vinyl

(c) 2012 Naomi Nicholls, Other Points of View (Installation view)
Wool, nails, acrylic paint, vinyl

 
 (c) 2012 Naomi Nicholls, Other Points of View (Installation view)
Wool, nails, acrylic paint, vinyl
 
  (c) 2012 Naomi Nicholls, Other Points of View (Installation view)
Wool, nails, acrylic paint, vinyl
 
 (c) 2012 Naomi Nicholls, Other Points of View (Installation view)
Wool, nails, acrylic paint, vinyl

 (c) 2012 Naomi Nicholls, Other Points of View (Installation view)
Wool, nails, acrylic paint, vinyl

 (c) 2012 Naomi Nicholls, Other Points of View (Installation view)
Wool, nails, acrylic paint, vinyl

  (c) 2012 Naomi Nicholls, Other Points of View (Installation view)
Wool, nails, acrylic paint, vinyl


Just a little catch up from last week.  Here is an installation that I completed last week.

An installation that sits inside an enclosed room with four walls, only one wall is blank.  From the doorway woodgrain look vinyl triangles are adhered to the floor tiles and project away from the door, toward the radiator.  Grey wool shoots up from the same point as the vinyl at the door and spreads out, attaching to a series of large hooks, already existing in the site, on the adjacent wall.  More grey wool launch from the corner of the radiator and fan out to attach to the opposite wall.  The wool creates a kind of half triangle in the space.  On the walls are a series of geometric shapes in pastel aqua acrylic paint and more woodgrain vinyl.  An outline in graphite of an interior is drawn with an untrue perspective and intertwines with other shapes.  Above the row of hooks is a patch of rolled peach acrylic paint.  Combined these various geometric shapes create an illusory space within the wall and appear to be a series of untrue perspectives combined.

This space had a lot of existing features to respond to, like the hooks, radiator and window.  I focussed a lot on perspective and line in this work, with only a small area for a painterly element.  I like painterly elements.  More painterly elements next time! I like coupling geometric shapes, lines and brushstrokes - or in this case roller strokes.